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Getting Our Ontology from the Structure of Language

Seems like a decent idea — so nouns must label something, therefore there are objects, adjectives can be rightly or wrongly applied to nouns, that gives us qualities, verbs have tense and that gives us time.  But it doesn’t apply so well to the practice of language itself, which seems to be a process that interacts with what it describes, and is therefore not an object or a quality.  Maybe the move from language to ontology is right, it’s just been executed poorly.

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One thought on “Getting Our Ontology from the Structure of Language

  1. Mikey says:

    Why would you get your ontology from the structure of language? Is it because you starting point is: everything we know about, we can think about, and everything we think about we think about in language. So everything we can know must be describable with language. So the limits of language are the limits of everything we can know. So the limits of language are the limits of everything worth thinking about. So the limits of language are the limits of everything.

    I had to type “define ontology” into Google.

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