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Does intelligent activity always aim at accomplishing something?

Can it be purely expressive?
Can it be refusal to participate with no goal in mind?
Can it be designed to honor or thank rather than to achieve?
If so what are the necessary and sufficient conditions for something to be intelligent activity?

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6 thoughts on “Does intelligent activity always aim at accomplishing something?

  1. Solving a math problem that has already been solved by someone else accomplishes nothing, but it helps the solver to learn or allows the solver to enjoy the process. Do those count as “accomplishing something?”

  2. Dancing brings joy, lets us appreciate music, or gives us exercise. Grieving allows us to process a tragedy so as to become psychologically capable of continuing our lives. Thanking makes others aware of our gratitude and changes (or perpetuates) their opinions of us. All of those are good accomplishments, so all of those things could be considered intelligent activities.

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